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English Literature since 1800: a library research guide: Home

Featured Resources

Adam Matthew Collections: Primary Sources for Research and Teaching

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Primary source collections from archives around the world. Collection themes include: area studies, cultural studies, empire and globalism, ethnic studies, gender and sexuality, history, politics, literature, theatre and war and conflict.

(A primary source is an original object or document-- the raw material or first-hand information, source material that is closest to what is being studied.)

Among Adam Matthew collections:

 

Romanticism: Life, Literature and Landscape

 

Francis Nicholson  (1753-1844) Watercolor on paper

Tintern Abbey by Francis Nicholson (1753-1844) Watercolor on paper

Nineteenth Century Literary Society

Victorian Popular Culture

Gender: Identity and Social Change

Poverty, Philanthropy and Social Condition in Victorian Britain

 

And other resources:

Queen Victoria's Journals

Portrait of Queen Victoria, painted by Franz Xaver Winterhalter, 1859 (Supplied by Royal Collection Trust / © HM Queen Elizabeth II 2012)

 

 

 

What are Primary sources?

A primary source is an original object or document-- the raw material or first-hand information, source material that is closest to what is being studied.

Primary source vary by discipline and can include historical and legal documents, eye witness accounts, results of an experiment, statistical data, pieces of creative writing, and art objects. In the natural and social sciences, the results of an experiment or study are typically found in scholarly articles or papers delivered at conferences, so those articles and papers that present the original results are considered primary sources.

secondary source is something written about a primary source. Secondary sources include comments on, interpretations of, or discussions about the original material.  Secondary source materials can be articles in newspapers or popular magazines, book or movie reviews, or articles found in scholarly journals that evaluate or criticize someone else's original research.

A tertiary source is a distillation and collection of primary and secondary sources.

See https://libguides.apsu.edu/primary_sources