This is the "Home" page of the "Scoring the Past: Exploring the Origins of Musical Imagery" guide.
Alternate Page for Screenreader Users
Skip to Page Navigation
Skip to Page Content

Scoring the Past: Exploring the Origins of Musical Imagery  

A research guide accompanying the October 10 Visions and Voices concert and lecture, Scoring the Past. It provides background information--including books and recordings--to help you learn more about Renaissance music.
Last Updated: Mar 3, 2009 URL: http://libguides.usc.edu/scoring Print Guide Email Alerts

Home Print Page
  Search: 
 
 

Events

Friday, October 10, 2008

Lecture/Video Presentation: 7:00pm

Concert: 8:00pm

 

Introduction

Scoring the Past: Exploring the Origins of Musical Imagery, organized by Adam Gilbert of USC Thornton School of Music and Peter Mancall of USC College, includes a video presentation, lecture, and concert that investigate the Renaissance origins of film music. Gilbert, Mancall, and Ross Scimeca of the USC Libraries have selected the following resources to help you learn more about the connections between Renaissance programmatic music and the vocabulary for human emotion in silent and contemporary film music.

Although most people think of programmatic music as consisting solely of film scores, music accompanying plays, or the symphonic poems of Franz Liszt and Richard Strauss, it actually dates back to the Renaissance and early Baroque periods. Claudio Monteverdi, Heinrich Ignaz Franz von Biber, and other composers from those eras imbued their compositions with rhythms that conveyed the emotions of human speech or replicated sounds from nature.

Philosophy/Humanities Librarian

Profile Image
Ross Scimeca
Contact Info
Hoose Library of Philosophy/University of Southern California/Los Angeles, CA 90089

24/7 Live Chat for research with Ross on Mondays, 3pm-4:45pm.
Send Email
 

About This Guide

Visions and Voices and the USC Libraries present Explorations, a series of research guides that allow you to build on your experiences at Visions and Voices events.

* Asterisk in guide title indicates core subject guide
Description

Loading  Loading...

Tip