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China in Documentary Film (Leavey Library): Social Life

Social Life

Hong Kong Trilogy
"Focuses on Hong Kong's residents in their childhood, youth, and old age. The questions raised by the Umbrella Movement — questions about how we can live together and what a society should be — permeate all three sections of this collaboratively made triptych."

Of Mothers and Daughters
"Examines the lives of two elderly Chinese women living in a retirement home in a suburb of Canton whose experiences with separation from their families and health concerns are shared by many older persons in a rapidly changing China."

The Secret of the Stone: Segmentary Lineage Organization in a North China Village
"Filmed on the Yellow River Plain about 200 miles south of Beijing, Song Family Village is home to 1,300 people. Some 80% of all villagers are members of a single lineage of the Song surname. The film documents New Year's customs to demonstrate the segmentary structure of the Song family lineage. Ancestor temples provide the focus for collective rituals that express the historical growth and fissioning into lineage segments. Minimal segments (mourning groups) are shown as interaction groups focused on the household shrines of senior agnates. Although the Communist-led Cultural Revolution tried to eliminate traditional kin-based institutions, this films shows that segmentary lineages are still a vigorous aspect of life in this North China village."

Ricki's Promise
"When internationally adopted American teenager Ricki Mudd returns to China to live with her long-lost birth family for a summer, she hopes to piece together the fragments of her mysterious past. Instead, Ricki finds more questions than answers as she is caught in a web of severed relationships, festering resentments, guilt and intrigue."

Young & Restless in China
"The lives of nine ambitious young Chinese professionals who are struggling to make it in this very tumultuous and rapidly changing society, defying Eastern cultural traditions in pursuit of more Western values."