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Visions & Voices: Mojada: A Medea in Los Angeles: About "Medea"

A resource for this theatrical production at the Getty Villa

About the Play

Medea, Greek Mēdeiatragedy by Euripides, performed in 431 BCE. One of Euripides’ most powerful and best-known plays, Medea is a remarkable study of injustice and ruthless revenge.

In Euripides’ retelling of the legend, the Colchian princess Medea has married the hero Jason. They have lived happily for some years at Corinth and have produced two sons. As the play’s action begins, Jason has decided to cast off Medea and to marry the daughter of Creon, king of Corinth. After a dreadful struggle between her passionate sense of injury and her love for her children, Medea determines that she will punish Jason by murdering not only her own sons but also the Corinthian princess, leaving Jason to grow old with neither wife nor child. She carries out the murders and escapes in the chariot of her grandfather, the sun-god Helios. Despite the monstrosity of Medea’s deeds, Euripides succeeds in evoking sympathy for her.

Source: "Medea." Encyclopaedia Britannica. Britannica Academic. Encyclopædia Britannica Inc., 2015. Web. 26 Aug. 2015. <http://academic.eb.com/EBchecked/topic/372093/Medea>.

These library books can provide more information on the original "Medea" by Euripides

TO FIND MORE LIBRARY BOOKS....

To search the USC Libraries catalog for more books on Euripides' Medea, click on this link:  MEDEA