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German and Dutch Language Feature Films in Leavey Library (DVDs): Books About German Cinema

Books About German Cinema (Selected Titles)

The Concise Cinegraph: Encyclopaedia of German Cinema
"This encyclopedia provides a comprehensive guide to German cinema that will interest both specialists, film students, and enthusiasts. While originally published in 1984, it has been continuously updated ever since. The English language version has been significantly revised and condensed. The reference covers actors, writers and cameramen, composers and production designers, film theorists and critics, producers and distributors, and inventors and manufacturers. The appendix includes brief essays on specific movements and periods within the German cinema genre."

German Film after Germany: Toward a Transnational Aesthetic
This complex, elegantly argued book addresses the production, distribution, and reception of 'German' films in an era of international coproductions and nascent European nationalism--an era fortified by the rise of the euro, a new currency that has in very short order emerged as a major world financial force. Halle (Univ. of Pittsburgh) considers what exactly a German film might be in an era that requires international cooperation to make films and in the face of ever-rising budgets and production costs--to say nothing of the need for international stars for marketing purposes. Citing film director Volker Schlondorff as a prime mover in the transnational German cinema, Halle notes that as the market for a film widens, the influence of the director lessens and is subsumed by that of the producer. The author also discusses the issue of language for marketing and the need to reach as many viewers as possible. And yet Halle believes that transnational cinema is not inherently compromised but rather gestures toward a new aesthetic that mediates formerly sacrosanct national boundaries."

Nation and Identity in the New German Cinema: Homeless at Home
"In this original study, Scharf investigates issues of national identity in films of the New German Cinema. Using a cultural studies analysis, Scharf argues that the conflict between this generation of critical filmmakers and their ‘German-ness’ translate into feature films that construct, and are pervaded by, a sense of 'homelessness' at home.A s the first cultural studies investigation of this cinematic movement, the book challenges existing film studies accounts by analyzing the New German Cinema within its social, temporal, and spatial contexts. Furthermore, with its broad concerns for the West German production context, the New German Cinema’s reception both nationally and internationally, as well as issues of representation, narration, and ‘Othering,’ Nation and Identity in the New German Cinema offers an interdisciplinary contribution to the ongoing debate on national cinema."